Top line

Myanmar’s military has ordered internet service providers to block access to Twitter and Instagram just a day after Facebook was also banned in the country to curb protests following a military coup.

People hold up candles and greet with three fingers in a market in Yangon on February 5, 2021. … [+] Myanmar. On Friday, the Myanmar people continued to donn or release red balloons – the color of the National League for Democracy (NLD) party.

Photo by Stringer / Getty Images

Key factors

Reuters reported that the military government had ordered telecommunications companies in the South Asian country to block social networks “until further notice,” Norwegian telecommunications company Telenor said.

The move comes after the military government, responsible for the country following a coup earlier this week, took similar measures against Facebook, claiming the social network could spread “false news and misinformation” that could lead to riot and riot, said the military.

Since Facebook was banned Thursday, many have turned to Instagram to organize a growing movement of civil disobedience to protest the coup and demand the return of the elected government.

Main critic

In a statement, Twitter said it was “deeply concerned” about the order to block Internet services in Myanmar and vowed to “work to end destructive government-led shutdowns”. “It undermines public speaking and people’s right to be heard,” said the spokesman.

Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment, but instead told Forbes after the country blocked Facebook that it “urges the authorities to restore connectivity so that people of Myanmar can communicate with their families and friends and access important information can access “.

Key background

Myanmar’s military staged a coup on Monday, arrested civilian leaders and declared themselves responsible for the country for a year. The military claims that an election won by the National League for Democracy (NLD) party last year and chairman Aung San Suu Kyi were fraudulent and included a clause in the constitution that allowed an armed takeover of government . World leaders have vigorously denounced the coup, although the US is debating whether to officially label it a coup, as that would automatically cut aid.